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January 28, 2015 / Stuart Mears

Tattoo Master Magazine

Another batch of social media madness has been thrust upon us once again. This time regarding our publication Tattoo Master. Once again we find ourselves having to explain our actions and reasons behind what and why we do things, so here goes.

We launched Tattoo Master as a quarterly trade magazine on the 1st August 2008. Over 6 years ago. A lot has changed and moved forward within the tattoo industry since then. Online tutorials, seminar events, online seminars, etc. etc. that anyone can tune in to see, whenever they want. We are all for the sharing of knowledge.

Issue 26 of Tattoo Master was the first of our issues to be sold on the newsstand in WHSmith. We are testing the market with 1,000 copies.

We are trying to make a difference. We are trying to move forward positively. We are trying to do what we believe is correct. You can help us achieve this for the good of our/your industry or you can sit and moan about anyone that comes along who tries to help move the world forward a notch at a time.

I have no time for people who sit around moaning, you generally find that you will waste your life doing this and we are not those kind of people.

Trent has written an explanation far better than I ever could of how we would like to move forward. It may or may not work, but if you don’t try, you’ll never know. This is not a money making exercise, as many will no doubt believe. Tattoo Master barely washes it’s face. If you don’t believe me, give it a go yourself.  As I mentioned earlier we are trying to make a positive difference.

If you have any suggestions that will help, our doors are always open please email either myself stuart@jazzpublishing.co.uk or Trent editor@tattoomaster.co.uk

Over to Trent…

Since I started as editor of Tattoo Master, I have wanted to change the scope of the magazine, to bring it in line with the changing world of tattooing and the tattoo artist. We are now working in an age where for the first time, tattooists are being looked on with respect as artists. With this in mind, one of my first objectives was to turn Tattoo Master into a peer review journal, rather than a trade magazine…and secondly, to get it into the hands of the public where we could solidify tattooing as a true art form.

For me Tattoo Master always could be so much more than it was. It had the potential to be a quarterly snapshot of all that is great about the world of tattooing. The best of the best. One publication that would feature interviews with artists by artists, equipment reviews that were written by artists, the history and culture of tattooing as seen from people in the tattoo world, not a media that is generally against us…and finally knowledge sharing.
Now this last bit has always been a sore point. Why should we share our knowledge with people who will use it to ruin what we love? Why should we be running tutorials that will teach scratchers how to scratch? I have never seen it in this light, rather, I have always seen it as a way to educate people to become better tattooists. Whether we run tutorials or not, these people will still be out there finding the information they need. There are so many websites and DVDs out there, anyone can learn how to tattoo, and by the best.
With this in mind, I decided to change tack. Over the last few issues I had quietly being pushing more of the art that tattooists do outside of tattooing; oil painting, wood cutting, building beautiful machines. I wanted to solidify the truth that a truly great artists is more than a tattooist. I chose to limit ‘tattoo tutorials’ to broad outlines of how an artists works and approaches his work rather than a step-by-step guide to tattooing. I wanted to show passion and philosophy, rather than technicalities. As a magazine, I believed we were no longer teaching people how to tattoo, we had begun to teach people what makes a great artist. And that is something special.
Over the last two years I have spoken to many artists about this approach, explaining my goals for the future of Tattoo Master and I have always been met with positive support. I know in my heart that this kind of approach will always meet with resistance, the tattoo world is a naturally secretive place. But I truly believe that we have a chance to make a difference with Tattoo Master, as a force for education and positive growth of the tattoo world.
I ultimately may be proven wrong, but that is what I believe.
January 26, 2015 / Stuart Mears

How low will people stoop? :(

It seems that there is a new tack that the “haters” are now trying. How low will people stoop?!

This morning I have read several social media posts which claim that we have been contacting studios / artists trying to poach artists who are working other shows. 100% NOT TRUE. We do not need to do this.

I am not saying that the artists who are saying this (or indeed believe this to be true) are lying, but IF you have received such a call, then someone is clearly phoning up these businesses – claiming to be us. If anyone gets one of these phone calls, please make a note of the telephone number and let us know, as identity theft is illegal.

We are a professional business and simply do not partake in such low practices.

This is getting pathetic and more and more ridiculous.

People are once again trying to paint us as the bad guys when this could not be further from the truth. WE don’t go online bitching and moaning of the underhanded tactics of other conventions (and believe me, there is a LOT that goes on.) I may myself write about it one day, it would make an interesting read. What we do is put on quality market leading events/shows/conventions that thousands of people turn up to and enjoy. If you were at Tattoo Freeze earlier this month, you would have seen how busy and fun it was. Most conventions would love that attendance/atmosphere and that’s what the real problem is.

These claims and lies come from jealousy, plain and simple.

You have the choice, and it is YOUR choice, to spend your hard earned cash where you want. My team speaks with hundreds of artists every week and we are hearing the SAME THING. People are sick and tired of the on-line nonsense and gossiping going on.

I’ll leave you with this (and again there are many more posts still, sadly many years on, like this). This is the sort of nasty people my colleagues and I have to continually read/take abuse off, clearly thinking they are better than anyone else (well 99% of them in this case) and now wishes that I get a terminal illness. What a absolute cock.

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Wake up and smell the coffee people! The only destructive force in the industry are these poisonous fools with chips on their shoulders…

October 21, 2014 / Stuart Mears

The 14th Manchester International Tattoo Show 2015

I see that there has been a lot of talk (once again) and personal attacks online, about my company, my colleagues and I.

The Manchester International Tattoo Show is 14 years old next year, it’s one of the more established tattoo conventions on the UK calendar. For the first 10 years of its life the event was held on the first weekend in March. 3 years ago we decided to move the dates to August, we were a much smaller company back then and the date change helped us to manage our events better with the small team we had. Although even now – there are still only 10 of us (hardly a ‘corporate’ company).

A few months later, Tattoo Tea Party was set up in Manchester to compete with our show. They decided to run on our usual dates and in the same city. We believe this was with the intention to confuse people into thinking we had moved venue. We didn’t cause a fuss with artists, traders and public and not one person was pressured by any of my team to not work this other convention. Was anyone else in uproar about this? No. A little hypocritical (once again) don’t you think?

In hindsight, our decision to move the dates to August was the wrong one, purely because over 100,000 people (students) move out of Manchester for the summer and our convention visitor attendance (compared to our other conventions) was affected because of this.

We are simply moving our Manchester Convention dates back to their original spot. We would have done this sooner but we had a 3 year contract to fulfill, so it was not possible. There is no underhandedness about this, in fact if the other convention had not set up in our original dates (and in Manchester) then this would not have been a problem for anyone.

Everyone has a choice, everyone. You are free to spend your hard earned cash how you choose. We believe we put on the best (it’s certainly the biggest) Manchester Tattoo Convention and if people choose to attend elsewhere then we do not have a problem at all with this.

As for underhanded play… the following domains were purchased to impersonate our show and redirect visitors to the Tattoo Tea Party.
www.manchestertattooconvention.com
www.manchestertattooconvention.co.uk

Registrant: Martin McIver one of the 5 (..five) directors of Tattoo Tea Party Limited.

With another director of the Tea Party being Neil Dalleywater, I would have expected that any concerns came from him – he has my number and email address, but I’ve heard nothing. I worked with Neil at Jazz for several years before he left, in doing so trying to destroy what we had spent so long building and he created a massive rift in our industry – but it seems he is content with people doing his work for him preferring to curry favour from behind the scenes. How many people were burnt with his Tattoo Revolution Magazine fiasco? Yet again – not one comment there either. Hypocritical.

Many personal attacks continue to appear on facebook without any real justification, many of these people having never been to our conventions for many years (if at all). Here are just a few… It really is unbelievable behaviour.

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We are not in the business of creating havoc. We are in the business of running magazines and events. It’s what we do as a company. Most of the people who are publicly berating us have benefited from at least one of our magazines or events, socialised with our staff and had a great many chats with us all saying what a great time they’ve had and how grateful they are. All of this online nonsense is hard to swallow, but even more so for the team here – who work incredibly hard. How anyone can see this online bullying and cajoling as acceptable is beyond me.

Mick McCormack has (once again!) fabricated ANOTHER false website dedicated to me.

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Also there is the online abuse that my colleagues and I have had to read (yet again!) Some of this being written by people we have helped out many times in the past. Below are just a handful of examples. As you can imagine there is much MUCH more.

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And then there are the people who love to stir, like the organiser of the Liverpool Tattoo Convention. Surely – these comments (and others) are made just to benefit his own event(s)?

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Then there are the liars, spinning their deceit and spreading rumours and lies, trying to make everyone turn on my company, my colleagues and I.

Alan Rat George “But when they put it on there wasn’t a Manchester tattoo show. The previous owners gave their blessing to the tea party when they called it a day doing the Manchester convention… it was the following year that mears had bought it and put it back on.”

Lies:
We purchased The Manchester International Tattoo Show in June 2011 and announced it in a press release on 1st July 2011 here: http://www.bigtattooplanet.com/forums/tattoo-talk/19673-press-release-01-07-11-a

http://www.tattoo tea party.com registered by Neil Dalleywater on 10th August 2011. Tattoo Tea Party Limited was incorporated 23rd August 2011 with 5 Directors. ALL OF THIS OCCURRED AFTER we had purchased The Manchester Tattoo Show.

I’ve also spoken to the previous Manchester International Tattoo Show owner after reading Alan Rat George’s comment, who has confirmed they did no such thing.

Alan Rat George, you are a perpetual liar (yes of course I have proof)

More lies…

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Lies again to try and maliciously sway peoples’ views. The truth is, I did look at a venue in Liverpool BUT this was BEFORE the Liverpool convention had even started! I visited the ACC Convention Centre many years back whilst looking for venues for Tattoo Jam. It was so long ago that they were still building the centre and I had to wear a hard hat and boots to be shown around. ACC Convention can obviously confirm this.

We will not be placing any event to purposely clash with another. Didn’t anyone notice the Leeds Convention was put on this year and clashed with our own Great British Tattoo Show? Strange that it didn’t (once again) raise one eyebrow amongst the very people who are moaning now. It’s so hypocritical.

Funnily enough, quite a few people have asked us to put a convention on in Liverpool. But we won’t and we won’t shout about that either, despite many people telling us what a poor convention it is. I’ve not personally been but, holding it in a hotel that even had an eight series fly-on-the-wall TV programme about how bad the place was, and giving artists a cramped (cheap cloth) trade space with no lights to work from doesn’t sound particularly great, or a befitting environment for such talented artists to work in.

Even more lies…

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Again after speaking to the original owners of the show, H2 Events were NOT co-organisers of the original Manchester show. They were (and I quote) “They were a service supplier…”

The directors of Tattoo Tea Party Limited are Richard Harrison, Susan Harrison, Samantha Harrison, Martin Mciver and Neil Dalleywater. Neil Dalleywater has a 25% share, Martin Mciver has a 25% share with the Harrison family owning 50% of Tattoo Tea Party Ltd. The Harrison family are the real force behind Tattoo Tea Party and believe have NO OTHER INTERESTS within the tattoo industry (I understand it’s property and corporate events, but that’s not really relevant).

How can the tattoo industry be truly seen as professional with so many trying to destroy its community?

I have been involved within the tattoo industry for over 16 years now; a long time. A lot longer than most that are now ranting. Anyone can see that we are not a business that’s in this for a fast buck; that we make huge investment in everything we do to promote the greater good of tattooing and improve standards; that we have helped grow the UK tattoo industry (that all within it earn a living from) and have made huge improvements in the way it was previously been perceived, through our magazines, conventions and websites.

It is truly TRULY unbelievable that this pettiness goes on. It’s time to wake up people and stop this from happening and support shows like ours and the likes of The London Tattoo Convention and The Brighton Tattoo Convention – both, you can see, continue to invest year after year in their events. This in turn improves the professional industry we all benefit from. A bit of professional rivalry is always good and keeps everyone from becoming complacent.

At the end of the day people will go to whatever show they like best, whether it’s on the same weekend or not. If one show is worse than another, then the organisers should have made it better!

If you want to come to The Manchester Tattoo Show then we look forward to welcoming you, if you don’t then I hope you enjoy that weekend, whatever you choose to do.

Thanks for reading this and listening to my side of the story, Stuart

January 8, 2013 / Stuart Mears

Today is a day…

Karma indeed...

April 3, 2012 / Stuart Mears

Shit, what an arse he has become…

I was speaking to an ex-colleague of mine this weekend and told her about this blog I have been forced to write.

Her words were, “Hi Stu… shit what an arse he has become… well he often was wasn’t he? But I always tried to give him the benefit of the doubt cos I thought he was my friend.. and you never like to think of friends that way do you? .. He fooled me so much”.

I asked if she would like to post something on it, to which she agreed and can be read as follows:

“Neil Dalleywater… Ethics… shouldn’t be spoken in the same sentence. The bloke doesn’t know the meaning of the word. Nor actually the meaning of loyalty, friendship, or trust.

My experience of his double dealings goes back many years, must be around twelve or so by now.

When I started at Jazz Publishing I worked as Ad Sales on Supertwins Magazine, Neil was then assistant editor to Rich King. Within a very short time of my working there, Rich King had been ousted, due – I must say – to his great ability to do as little amount of work as possible, in the most amount of time.

The point here though, is that Rich and Neil were longtime friends going back many years. Who do you think it was complaining most (and to the management) about Rich and his lack of work ethic? …yep you have it… his best mate Neil… Who do you think knew he was being asked to leave a week before he did? Yep, you got it. Who do you think organised to get his job when Rich was asked to leave? … Yep, right again… his best mate.. Neil.

Meanwhile, as at that point – Neil was a professed lifestyle biker, always had been always will be… his words, not mine… Although we loved working on Supertwins, we both preferred a more lifestyle kind of bike, the ‘home built in the shed’ type of thing. We began to badger Stuart to create a new magazine, one we could both work on and really love.

It worked in the end… and 100% Biker Magazine was born… Neil had spent months declaring, as had I, that this was his dream, to be Editor of a magazine for real bikers. Real grass roots stuff, shoestring money builds. So why, after only three issues did he leave us completely in the proverbial doo-doo and walk out at the drop of a hat when our rival magazine offered him loads more dosh?! He knew he was leaving weeks before and never said a word, hoping to cause the maximum damage. It was a ploy to make the magazine fold, as we were doing their sales a fair amount of damage. They thought without an Editor we would have to fold…

Luckily, I had been helping out with event coverage, and sourcing bikes and talking to bike builders and felt we had enough articles to put together another couple of issues to enable us time to find a replacement editor. A good friend, Paul Cave – who at that time edited Total VW Magazine, showed me the ropes and was there to give me enormous support and backup. We never looked back. I went on to stay as Editor until I left Jazz to move to Portugal in 2007. Neil only lasted a few months in his new post, due to mental health problems.

Meanwhile back at Jazz, life carried on as normal. Our sister publication Skin Deep was going great guns, but there were differences of opinions between Editorship and management. The debate over paid-for ads from supply companies is one that I think will never ever be solved, it’s all down to personal choices. I don’t know all the exact differences between Sally the then editor and Stuart, but it at times, seemed unsolvable.

During this time, I had become friendly with Neil again, I had kept in touch with his lovely lady Kate and over time, forgiven his desertion of us as a mid-life crisis type of thing. Neil wasn’t really that ruthless, I convinced myself. So when it was discussed that maybe a new editor of Skin Deep would have to be found, Neil’s name popped up.

Sadly I was the person who convinced Stuart that Neil was not a bad bloke, and that he would be perfect for the job and to trust him and give him another chance. Neil was also a friend of Sally, he knew the ropes, the freelancers and had an interest in tattoos. At that point he was running his own small and failing bike repair business in North Wales.

So, yet again, Neil slipped into a job behind the current persons back, all discussed, set up and sorted before they knew it. I again, as Neil’s friend thought this was a bit underhand, but sometimes things work out that way. You never want to believe such shit of people you care about do you?

Neil KNEW right from the start, before he took the Editor of Skin Deep’s job, that most of the problems between Stuart and Sally were based on one huge thing, paid-for ads of supply company stuff. The fact that some tattooists didn’t agree with advertising supplies through a non-industry publication. He knew, he didn’t agree with Sally, he took the job and Stuarts money. He would run ads, he wanted a successful magazine, as we all did.

I had the desk next to him for years. Neil’s priority for his magazine was for it to be successful; scruples were just something you gave out to the public… what matters in magazine terms is advertising revenue… it plays an important part for the success of a title.

I was astounded when I read of Neil’s so called ‘ethical’ resignation from Jazz Publishing. I had known that over the years he had managed to remake himself from a lifestyle biker into Mr Tattoo Magazine, but to give up his job in such a public way and to revile Stuart who had given him back a job, trust and friendship (yes until then, they were friends, mountain biking together, gardening, pig courses! the lot) was beyond belief to me.

Then, slowly, the situation sunk in – and knowing how Neil had acted previously, I began to wonder what his next job would be? It must already be organised, it must be in competition with Jazz and it must be timed to cause as much controversy and damage as possible!

I couldn’t believe he was doing it again… and people fall for it every time…!

As you may all know, at the time, he refuted the fact that he had a job to go to, he refuted the fact that he was setting up in competition to Jazz. He publicly stated, it was all about ‘ethics’.

Ethics, Neil… Don’t make me laugh… He couldn’t even tell you what the word means..

Does this sound bitter… or even cynical and disgusted? .. yes, you bet I am.

Pat Rihoy

March 29, 2012 / Stuart Mears

It seems the smiling assassin has stabbed someone else in the back!

Many of you will be aware from recent posts on this blog about how and why Jazz Publishing and myself have been the subject of a social media “hate” campaign. Much of the activity started when Neil Dalleywater and Alex Guest (then-editors of Skin Deep and Tattoo Master magazine) left the company under a cloud of unexplained events and behaviour.

I recently met with Alex (ex-editor of Tattoo Master) and his partner Zoe in a pub. We spent a few hours talking about things that have happened since the very public leaving from Jazz Publishing of him and Neil Dalleywater from their roles as editors on two of our titles.

Alex very kindly agreed to put his side of goings on, on my blog. It’s always interesting to hear other sides of a story – it’s hugely important. I am very grateful to them both for being so open and honest. Firstly, for apologising to me in person; secondly, for being courteous enough to tell me information I was not aware of. I wish I knew more people like this. Thank you, both.

Here is Alex’s comments taken from his blog:

Divine Karma Publishing, TRM Publishing and Tattoo Revolution Magazine: Nowt to do with me, pal…

Hi. I’m Alex Guest. You may remember me from publications such as Skin Deep, Tattoo Master, The Tattoo Bible and for a while, I was the editor of Tattoo Revolution Magazine. I’ve also written for the good folk of Total Tattoo. Then I disappeared altogether. 



If you do remember me, this may interest you. Or it may not. Either way, I’ve no doubt this will ruffle a few feathers but frankly, I really couldn’t give a fuck who it upsets. I’ve written this because I want to make it clear that I have zero involvement with Tattoo Revolution Magazine, Divine Karma Publishing or TRM Publishing. Many people are under the impression that I’m still at Revolution yet I haven’t been a director of Divine Karma Publishing since April 2011 and I haven’t worked in a freelance capacity for Tattoo Revolution Magazine since September 2011. I’m doing this now because of Stuart Mears’ blog post here: So .. this is the new and more ‘ethical’ future of tattooing, is it?

Let me quote him here in his entirety:

“On 15th March, just as I was leaving work for the day, an email (a very interesting email) appeared in my inbox. I have since spoken to Dean at Imagery, the printing company this email was from and he is happy for me to show you what he wrote to me.

Hi Stuart,

I have recently read a blog from your regarding our mutual friend Divine Karma Publishing. We printed four issues of Tattoo Revolution. Two of which we have been paid for. Then in Jan Mr Dalleywater tells me sales have not been that great and he can now not pay us the £ 12,000 he owes us and further more has sold the magazine. However he seems to have sold it for nothing but magic beans.

Or what is more likely just transferred it to a different name leaving us up a certain river without a certain paddle. We are sending the matter to our solicitors today. If you have any information on the wonderful Mr Dalleywater I would appreciate it if you could let me know.
He paid his first issue upfront and then his second on thirty days and seamed a very nice chap. It appears all is not what it seams

Thanks

Dean Booth

Commercial Manager

Imagery

In my conversation with Dean he also said that when Neil Dalleywater, whilst acting very friendly and nice (as he always does!), was asked who he had sold the magazine too, said he “did not know their details”!  Dean also told me that from his research, Neil had set up another company – called TRM Publishing Ltd. whilst Imagery was printing his magazine for Divine Karma Publishing Ltd. – suggesting Neil knew that he was never going to pay their print bill.

It seems that Tattoo Revolution is now being published by TRM Publishing Ltd. It also seems that Dean was right, Neil Dalleywater may have sold his magazine for magic beans, to himself! For Neil Dalleywater is the sole director of TRM Publishing Ltd.

WHEN ARE PEOPLE GOING TO WAKE UP TO WHAT’S ‘REALLY’ HAPPENING HERE? HOW MANY TIMES CAN THE WOOL BE PULLED OVER YOUR EYES!?!

I have since had a conversation with Andrew Jones. Andrew is the Group Managing Director of Stephens & George Print Group, who printed the first few issues of Tattoo Revolution for Neil Dalleywater of Divine Karma Publishing Ltd. Andrew informs me that they too have not been paid for the printing of Tattoo Revolution Magazine to the sum of £5,800.

It would seem that the magazine was moved to another printer, in this case Imagery, when they could not pay the bill, it would also seem that someone else is now printing Tattoo Revolution Magazine, in the wake of the two previous print companies that have not yet been paid.
I am strangely starting to believe in Karma… :)
..and as for this “ethical” tattoo venture …. don’t make me laugh!”

Stuart’s not an idiot when it comes to publishing and libel laws; these statements are indeed verifiable. I guess you can see quite clearly why I want the tattoo world to know that I’m not involved with Neil or the magazine in any context. When I was edged out of the business, the printers were paid upfront for the magazines and credit was not an option whilst I was part of the company. The first priority was always to pay the printers and get the magazine out, and frankly I think it takes the piss that these print companies are now out of pocket. TRM Publishing has sprung up as the publisher of Tattoo Revolution Magazine, but Stuart was torn to shreds over his dealings, and I’ve yet to hear a murmur of objection about Neil’s handling of things. What kind of bullshit double standard is that?

Now we’ve established that I’m not part of the Revolution any longer and why I’m so disgusted at what’s gone on, let’s get to why I ceased to be part of Tattoo Revolution Magazine.

The week before my daughter was due to be born in April of 2011, Neil met with me to collect some magazines from my house and then out of the blue informed me that the Divine Karma Publishing could no longer support us both. He had brought with him the termination forms required by Companies House to rescind company director appointments and asked me to sign out of the company. I had no stake or liability in Divine Karma Publishing’s financial affairs so this just left one question: what was to be my involvement with the magazine? Neil told me I was to remain as editor on a freelance basis and articles I submitted would be considered on top of the basic editor work (i.e. proofing, copy editing, etc). We agreed that we’d come to a join statement announcing my departure and it would be something upbeat and positive.

I read in the first Tattoo Revolution editorial following my termination as director of Divine Karma Publishing that I’d left the magazine to spend more time with my family and pursue freelance work. I had no say in the content of that statement, and it’s a flat-out lie. I mean, how many people do you know can afford to decide to suddenly drop out of a full-time roll in a venture that they’d committed career suicide for? Doesn’t make sense, does it? You might allege that the whole ‘agreement’ about remaining as editor was a porky pie used as leverage to ease my signature onto those termination papers.

I was removed from the magazine contact section as editor by the very next issue and my editor ‘contract’ lasted just one month before I was again told “the business couldn’t afford me”. I wrote a total of three articles for Tattoo Revolution Magazine, and I chose to bring this to an end for three reasons. Firstly, because payment for my last article was way overdue and took a lot of chasing to secure. Secondly, because the look and feel of the magazine wasn’t what I identified with or wanted to be a part of. Thirdly, because my new full-time job demanded all of my time and attention, time that apparently should have been spent with my newborn daughter.

The question I’m sure anyone reading this will ask is “Why did you wait so long to put this information out there?”. That’s simple: I told two groups of friends what had happened at the time of these events and there was barely a raised eyebrow amongst them, let alone any show of support towards me. That told me all I needed to know about where loyalties would lie should I go public. I was still green in the tattoo world by comparison and I wasn’t part of the crowd that makes its voice heard above all others. I colluded to a lie by keeping quiet and fading away without a murmur at the time because I really didn’t see how anyone else would care what had happened. If your friends don’t take your side, then who else do you look to?

I’m sure others will decry all of this as lies, and you’re of course welcome to your opinion if you think I’ve made this up. You’d be wrong, but again, welcome to your opinion. Ask yourself this: what would I stand to gain by lying about it now? I have no stake in the tattoo world in any guise and nor do I intend to reprise a role. Sorry to piss on your bonfire, but there’s simply nothing in it for me to go around making stuff up after a year of keeping it quiet. All of this is the truth, albeit an undoubtedly inconvenient truth for some people.

I’m doing this now, making my story public now, because I’m not the only one who has been affected by either Neil Dalleywater or Tattoo Revolution’s ‘ethics’. This isn’t about whether or not people will believe me or about starting up the next battle: it’s simply about disassociating myself from Neil and Tattoo Revolution because businesses are now being affected by their collective dealings, and I want everyone to know I had no involvement or prior knowledge of any situation that would lead to a default on future debts.

In September of last year I took a step back from the tattoo world, deleting my Facebook and relinquishing the freelance work I occasionally embarked on with Total Tattoo (to whom I’m extremely grateful). I was tired of seeing sycophantic posts and remarks from people who had no idea as to what had gone on and knowing full well that trying to correct the misconceptions and fallacies on Facebook would be as productive as pissing into a hurricane and hoping to stay dry.

As 2012 dawned I took stock of all that had gone on and realised there was an irony in that I’d spent so long trying to destroy one person’s place in the tattoo industry when I ultimately lost my own. If that’s not karma, I don’t know what is. I don’t seek sympathy because this is the outcome of the risk I took, and I knew full well that losing my career was a possibility. The situation just is.

In seeking to redress the balance, I met up with Stuart earlier this year to put an end to our feud. We apologised, shook hands and left with what I think was a sense of closure on the situations we’d put each other through. I’ve no doubt that will get the rumour mill churning and have people questioning my motives for this post, but I again refer you to my earlier disclaimer: I honestly couldn’t give a fuck what anyone’s opinion of me may be. My conscience is clear. I wonder how many others can say that with hand on heart?

March 21, 2012 / Stuart Mears

So .. this is the new and more ‘ethical’ future of tattooing, is it??!!!

On 15th March, just as I was leaving work for the day, an email (a very interesting email) appeared in my inbox.  I have since spoken to Dean at Imagery, the printing company this email was from and he is happy for me to show you what he wrote to me.

Hi Stuart,

I have recently read a blog from your regarding our mutual friend Divine Karma Publishing. We printed four issues of Tattoo Revolution. Two of which we have been paid for. Then in Jan Mr Dalleywater tells me sales have not been that great and he can now not pay us the £ 12,000 he owes us and further more has sold the magazine. However he seems to have sold it for nothing but magic beans.

Or what is more likely just transferred it to a different name leaving us up a certain river without a certain paddle. We are sending the matter to our solicitors today. If you have any information on the wonderful Mr Dalleywater I would appreciate it if you could let me know.

He paid his first issue upfront and then his second on thirty days and seamed a very nice chap. It appears all is not what it seams

Thanks
Dean Booth
Commercial Manager
Imagery

In my conversation with Dean he also said that when Neil Dalleywater, whilst acting very friendly and nice (as he always does!), was asked who he had sold the magazine too, said he “did not know their details”!  Dean also told me that from his research, Neil had set up another company – called TRM Publishing Ltd. whilst Imagery was printing his magazine for Divine Karma Publishing Ltd. – suggesting Neil knew that he was never going to pay their print bill.

It seems that Tattoo Revolution is now being published by TRM Publishing Ltd.  It also seems that Dean was right, Neil Dalleywater may have sold his magazine for magic beans, to himself! For Neil Dalleywater is the sole director of TRM Publishing Ltd.

WHEN ARE PEOPLE GOING TO WAKE UP TO WHATS ‘REALLY’ HAPPENING HERE?  HOW MANY TIMES CAN THE WOOL BE PULLED OVER YOUR EYES!?!

I have since had a conversation with Andrew Jones.  Andrew is the Group Managing Director of Stephens & George Print Group, who printed the first few issues of Tattoo Revolution for Neil Dalleywater of Divine Karma Publishing Ltd.  Andrew informs me that they too have not been paid for the printing of Tattoo Revolution Magazine to the sum of £5,800.

It would seem that the magazine was moved to another printer, in this case Imagery, when they could not pay the bill, it would also seem that someone else is now printing Tattoo Revolution Magazine, in the wake of the two previous print companies that have not yet been paid.

I am strangely starting to believe in Karma…  :)
..and as for this “ethical” tattoo venture …. don’t make me laugh!

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